BELINDA GROVER PHOTOGRAPHY

STOPS ALONG THE WAY


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DAMSELFLIES (TWO PHOTOGRAPHS)

After photographing certain subjects for a while you begin to anticipate their behaviour. In the case of damselflies (and dragonflies) they tend to return to the same perch you might have startled from as you approached. So if you don’t get the shot the first time your chances are good the second time around.


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PAINTED TURTLE (TWO PHOTOGRAPHS)

This lake has a fair number of resident turtles. As I scanned the water for birds, I noticed a painted turtle enjoying a swim. Now it and its mates are buried deep in the mud, hibernating until spring.


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PERFECT PAD (TWO PHOTOGRAPHS)

This lake has a lot of lily pads which these frogs call home. They blend in so well that often only a splash or movement alerts you to their whereabouts. The photo below gives you a good idea of their environment and how well they blend in.


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BARRED OWL

The barred owl or hoot owl is very common in Ontario though I’ve only seen one twice. Like most owls they are nocturnal but both my sightings were during the day. This owl was just slightly off the main path, I happened to look up and there he was.


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BLUE(T)S AND GREENS OF SUMMER

The bluet damselfly is a common visitor in early summer, often seen near bodies of water. Like many birds and insects, when they become accustomed to your presence they’ll often linger for a portrait.


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NORTHERN CARDINAL

I took this photo in late July, so I think the cardinal had just begun to molt. Molting begins after mating season and before the cold weather sets in. They can look pretty rough over several weeks but this bird still looked pretty spiffy.


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PEREGRINE FALCON

On a drive one day, we stopped at a reserve that advertised a wild bird display. This peregrine falcon was waiting his turn and seemed to look in my direction so I took the shot. I’m not a great fan of these events but the birds were beautiful and if people take away an appreciation of them it can only help conservation efforts.


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BALTIMORE ORIOLE

There are nine species of Orioles in North America; both the Baltimore Oriole and Orchard Oriole can be found here in the east but I’ve yet to see an Orchard Oriole. This colourful bird usually shows up in May and stays the summer.


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BEE WATCHING

I like to watch bees as they work their way among the flowers. This one had just gotten started as it hadn’t pick up much pollen yet. I took this photo with a long lens, you can get quite near to the insects without disturbing them or getting too close for your own comfort.


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DOWNY WOODPECKER

Downy Woodpeckers are the smallest of the woodpeckers and quite numerous. We enjoy them year round. They don’t cache food but survive the winter by excavating the trees for overwintering insects. They are also a frequent visitor to bird feeders.


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BROWN CREEPER (TWO PHOTOGRAPHS)

This was a first for me and the only time I’ve ever seen a brown creeper, so it was pretty exciting. Their numbers are declining in the eastern part of North America, due to habitat loss, so I was particularly happy to see one. It’s called a brown creeper but I thought it looked more like it was hugging the tree as it foraged for insects.


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CANADA GEESE (TWO PHOTOGRAPHS)

Canada Geese may have their detractors but on a lake in the fall they are among my favourite subjects. They’ve had their young and territory is no longer an issue so scenes like this are common. Ottawa is a city that includes a lot of rural land, so you don’t have to go too far to see them flying in their wonderful V formations (or echelons) as they head south.